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Raiding During Autumn: The Success Story Continues

The autumn part of the 2009 Liszt Festival in Raiding ended recently with a brilliant concert by Oleg Maisenberg. Johannes and Eduard Kutrowatz could then draw a terrific balance. Raiding is booming!

The festival summary, reported by both of the new directors, is very impressive: "We are pleased that the audience has taken so euphorically to our first Liszt Festival and that the performances were so enthusiastically received by the press. With over 5700 attendees -- corresponding to a growth of over 25% compared to last year -- and a utilized capacity of roughly 90%, we have achieved a new record this year! We already very much look forward to 2010, as well as the great Liszt year 2011 © LISZTOMANIA, where international stars will once again give guest performances here in Raiding."

Interest in the life story and works of the Pannonian tone prince is uninterruptedly great (right: Franz Liszt's birth house; left: the new Liszt Hall)

Interest in the life story and works of the Pannonian tone prince is uninterruptedly great (right: Franz Liszt's birth house; left: the new Liszt Hall)

Liszt Hall had again been sold out for weeks.

Liszt Hall had again been sold out for weeks.

The tilted presentation (of the photo) is misleading: the artists Eduard and Johannes Kutrowatz and Gerhard Krammer soaked up the audience’s applause at the end of an exciting evening concert.

The tilted presentation (of the photo) is misleading: the artists Eduard and Johannes Kutrowatz and Gerhard Krammer soaked up the audience’s applause at the end of an exciting evening concert.

Les Préludes

The two artists also personally laid the cornerstone for the great success of the second part of the 2009 Liszt Festival as well as the first festival concert (Oct. 21).

"Our life is something other than a series of preludes to that unknown song whose first and ceremonial note intones death," Franz Liszt wrote in his commentary to the symphonic poem "Les Préludes." In contrast to its intended purpose, its famous Lisztian fanfare became an acoustical signal for messages by the German Armed Forces nearly 100 years after its composition. Liszt's words ought to find confirmation in the chaos of human life millions of times over.

The brothers cautiously start the tender, nostalgic melody that begins the work. Step by step, they open up the mighty sound of the two Bösendorfers, up to the first story main theme...

A difficult work (in the original version for 2 pianos) with which Johannes and Eduard started the second half of the 2009 Liszt Festival before 600 visitors to the sold-out Liszt Hall; a work with which they could once more demonstrate their great technical ability and their profound interpretations.

Alma Rosé

As a sort of contrasting program to the misused symphonic poem, the brothers from Burgenland, Austria then played Gerhard Krammer's "rose," which was dedicated to the memory of the violinist Alma Rosé, who died in Auschwitz. To amplify the sonic contrast to "Les Préludes" optically as well, the pianists put on white gloves in between.

Bach transcriptions

In the finale, Kurtág's Bach transcriptions led us back to more familiar terrain. Music with glowing intensity in turn opened up to the audience, which, not idle, thanked the pianists and directors with shouts of "bravo" and a standing ovation. (rulö)

See you in 2010!

See you in 2010!

Plans for Raiding in 2010 can be found on the Liszt Festival's website: www.lisztfestival.at

(Photo credits: liszt festival, liszt zentrum)

Bösendorfer References:
www.boesendorfer.com
Bösendorfer Reference List:
www.boesendorfer.com