Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Tuning my piano – Why and how often?
  2. Why is a Bösendorfer grand piano an acquisition that will keep its value for generations?
  3. Which pianists prefer playing a Bösendorfer?
  4. Is it true that I am able to design my own piano model?
  5. Is it true that there are Bösendorfer grand pianos with more strings compared to other grand pianos?
  6. Why does the Model 290 Imperial have more keys than a normal piano?
  7. What are the Bosendorfer regulation specifications?

Tuning my piano – Why and how often? 
Climatic factors such as temperature or humidity changes may cause the precise tuning of your piano to vary. Also naturally over time the tuning will alter due to the tensions the strings are constantly under.
If your piano receives normal use, we advise you to have your instrument tuned 2 or 3 times a year. Instruments which are being used more frequently, such as concert halls and recording studios, are being tuned before each concert or recording session. Each Bösendorfer dealer has highly qualified piano tuners at their disposal among their staff or can recommend an expert to you.
The pianos are manufactured in the factory at a tuning pitch of A443 Hertz, however it may be altered between A440 Hertz and A445 Hertz according to need.

Why is a Bösendorfer grand piano an acquisition that will keep its value for generations? 
For one thing, our instruments are painstakingly crafted by hand, not produced on an assembly line by robots; for another thing, unlike a car, a grand piano is an acquisition that will keep its value for generations.
When our high-quality skilled workmanship – which starts when we select only the best, sound-promoting materials – is compared with the car industry, it is clear that the purchase of a grand piano represents unbelievably good value in every respect.
Each Bösendorfer grand piano is the product of not only over a whole year's work but also expertise passed down from generation to generation since the company was founded in 1828.

Which pianists prefer playing a Bösendorfer? 
Every pianist who dares to play the touching sound sooner or later finds his way to Bösendorfer. A list - incomplete, of course – shows some of the most famous artists who play or played on Bösendorfer pianos, as well as other well-known figures who own or owned a Bösendorfer instrument you can find here:
www.boesendorfer.com

Is it true that I am able to design my own piano model? 
Yes. True to the fact that we are a REAL manufacture building our pianos by hand, custom-made grand pianos are no problem to us.
In case of interest please contact us, we would be glad to answer all your questions: mail@boesendorfer.com

Is it true that there are Bösendorfer grand pianos with more strings compared to other grand pianos? 
There are two Bösendorfer models with more than 88 keys (7 1/4 octaves). One is the Imperial, with 97 keys, i.e., eight full octaves. The other is the model 225 grand piano, with four additional sub-bass keys that extend the bass range to bottom F. This expanded range requires both models to have more strings.

Why does the Model 290 Imperial have more keys than a normal piano? 
Originally built following a suggestion by composer Ferruccio Busoni, the Imperial has 97 keys, i.e. eight full octaves. This expanded range allows faithful performances of a number of compositions by Bartók, Debussy, Ravel and, not least, Busoni.

What are the Bosendorfer regulation specifications? 
Grand Pianos

Let off 1.5mm
Drop 2.mm
Key height 65mm
Key Dip 10.2mm
Sharp height 12.5mm above natural keys
Blow 46mm
Check 14mm
Damper Lift 23mm

Vertical Pianos

Let off 3mm
Key height 64mm
Key dip 10.2mm
Sharp height 12.5mm above naturals
Blow 45mm
Check 14mm
Damper Lift 22.5mm